top of page

STEREOSCOPE -Wick Architecture & Design

U.S.

STEREOSCOPE -Wick Architecture & Design

Stereoscope Ceiling

#Advertisement

PROJECT DETAILS:

Project Name: Stereoscope
Project Size: 672 square feet
Client & Property Owner: Granite Properties
Client: Stereoscope
Artist: Christy Lee Rogers Art piece: The Reunion of Cathryn Carrie and Jean General

Contractor: Pacific Contracting Group Mechanical
Engineer: Linwood Engineering Photographer: Benny Chan
Printing: Big Visual Group
Lighting: Astro Globe lighting fixtures from Andrew Neyer’s Suff
Tile: Bone Tile by Wink Design Source Stone: Blue Orca Marble by Wink Design Source Opening
Date: March 2020

To know about the designers click the link below

#Advertisement


Situated on the ground level of a large two building complex sharing a common courtyard is Stereoscope, a branded coffee shop in Newport Beach. Wick Architecture & Design, in partnership with LAND Design Studio, created a unique ambiance of stereoscope that is turning heads with its cathedral-like opulence.

#Advertisement


The main task for the design was to imbue excitement into a narrow, L shaped area with a 15 feet high ceiling. The two entrances at both the ends of the L shaped are connected to this space, including one adjoining the building’s lobby and another connecting to the exterior courtyard. A unique challenge of working with the layout together with Stereoscope Coffee’s taste for modern, minimalism formed a unique challenge for Wick and Lindley.

David Wick and Andrew Lindley harkened back to a recent trip to Italy, where they had the opportunity to view Correggio’s Assumption of the Virgin, a 16th-century fresco adorning the dome of the Cathedral of Parma. The duo envisioned the opportunity of a modern interpretation and variation of that historic Renaissance approach, with a multi-dimensional aspect to it that would grab the essence of the word ‘Stereoscope’, a forerunner to modern 3D technology. With a concept in mind, the design team turned its attention to the challenge of drawing the vision to life as a body of work that would fascinate the masses.