Into the Rabbit Hole Design Competition
– Top 3!

Austria

Woman in Swimsuit

Miriam Loescher

Woman in Swimsuit

Elizaveta Karpacheva

Woman in Swimsuit

Sharon Sarfati

Team Details: Miriam Loescher, Elizaveta Karpacheva, Sharon Sarfati

Woman in Swimsuit

1. Introduction
Coming from different backgrounds Miriam Löscher (Slovakia), Elizaveta Karpacheva (Russia) and Sharon Sarfati (Israel), now we are pursuing master architecture studies at the die Angewandte [University of Applied Arts Vienna] in studio Hani Rashid.


2. When and how were you first introduced to architecture?
[Elizaveta Karpacheva] My first introduction to architecture happened on the first day of the architecture bachelor studies. Coming from a family of doctors, I did not have anyone connected to an architecture circle to talk about design and architecture in general. So it was all pretty new to me when I started. But the general interest for quality of spaces and city planning got me curious to explore the field and all the possibilities that it can lead to.

[Miriam Löscher] Same for me. I have not thought of it too much before, maybe because the connection of the public towards architecture is rather shallow, but when I got to understand what it takes and what it strives for, I think it is a very exciting and vast discipline where one can have multiple sub-interests interpreted.

[Sharon Sarfati]

[Sharon Sarfati] In fact, also for me, my first introduction to this profession occurred during my Bachelor's studies. It has never been a dream, but as I started my journey to become an Architect, it indeed developed into something that fascinates me, and something that I would like to peruse and could make a change and an impact on people’s daily life.


3. What is your design philosophy?
As humans on this planet we are surrounded all the time and have a huge impact over everydays decisions, everydays scenarios that we may or may not encounter depending on the set-up.
Therefore we think that the design should pay attention to the human's mind and natural behavioural process and accommodate both physical and mental needs. We as humans and designers think that the aim of human-centric design is to alter the outer environment in a way that we can benefit from it even more.


4. What does architecture mean to you?
[Elizaveta Karpacheva] For me, architecture can be many things, buildings and cityscapes, the material research and technological advances, theoretical works. But if we talk about the built environment, it is a link between all living things- humans, flora and fauna, integrated into a natural world. We interact with it every day and it is important what it does to a human being, does it support the mental wellbeing or suppresses it?


[Miriam Löscher] For me, architecture is all man-made around us, therefore being an architect means the possibility to affect everyday life of many people, animals and nature in a pleasing way, both functionally and aesthetically.


[Sharon Sarfati]

[Sharon Sarfati] For me Architecture is a field of research and design implications, aiming at understanding the living. Also, I see it as a field of optimism on a planet full of opportunities. The ability to have an impact on the perception and the memory of someone is a sensitive subject, that the act of the architect has a responsibility to perform.


5. Briefly explain your design process and your perspective on the role of architecture in healing the human mind.
Depends on every project in particular, and this one was very different. As much as possible we were trying to take the scientific research on one hand, and on the other hand there was plain will for objective architectural interpretation. If we take the data and make it a space, in this case it is crucial to be obvious what the data was (ed how shape of room affects brain waves when sound introduced, etc).
For the beginning we took the platonic objects with proven qualities and tweaked them by different design strategies. Because the whole process needed to be strictly controlled and well thought-through, we decided it was easier to perform each operation manually.
Overall, this was extremely hard, because a. we did not clearly know what the result would be, b. every artistic decision is partly subjective and to separate one from another was not easy, as one is not used to needing to do this. Each architectural decision had to be thought through and afterwards well evaluated and if it was not compelling to the main goal, it was diminished.

Our surroundings have immediate and long-lasting effects on our both physical and mental health. Therefore, we think that it is inevitable to pay much needed attention to the question of what affects us in which particular way and if it results as being negative, then what we can do so it has a positive impact instead. If we can provide a calming and relaxing environment for every human being in everyday life, we believe that it can be very helpful in reduction of the accumulated stress hormones and thereby negative emotions.

interview - video 

Synthetic Natures by Miriam Loescher, Elizaveta Karpacheva, Sharon Sarfati

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Synthetic Natures by Miriam Loescher, Elizaveta Karpacheva, Sharon Sarfati

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Synthetic Natures by Miriam Loescher, Elizaveta Karpacheva, Sharon Sarfati

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Synthetic Natures by Miriam Loescher, Elizaveta Karpacheva, Sharon Sarfati

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