Sensory Museum Design Winners - Andrei Dragos Ormangi, Alexandra Elena Burtea & Dana Beatrice Ponyiczky

Romania

Woman in Swimsuit

Woman in Swimsuit

Woman in Swimsuit

Woman in Swimsuit

Andrei Dragos Ormangi

I am Andrei-Dragos Ormangi, a fourth-year architecture student at “Ion Mincu University of Urbanism and Architecture” in Bucharest, Romania. I’m 22 years old and have been in touch with the realm of the arts ever since I was a little kid. This lead me to pursue architecture, for it is a powerful means of artistic expression and a mandatory tool for shaping a better future.

1. Please introduce yourself in a personal and professional way.
Hello! I am Andrei Ormangi, a fourth-year architecture student at “Ion Mincu University of Urbanism and Architecture in Bucharest. I have always been an individual who creates and sources inspiration from experiences and feelings. I’m highly observant of my surroundings, having an affinity for understanding how people interact with the given natural and artificial world that encapsulates all of us. I also have a passion for visual arts and their crossover with computerised design.

2. What is your design philosophy?
Anthropology walks hand in hand with architecture. The people and their habits make architecture what it is in essence – a smart network of organisms. Designs must interact with humans and they must coexist dependent one on another. The more interactive a space is, the more useful it is. Understanding and creating these objects beyond their physical elements is what creates this compatibility.

3. Can you briefly explain your understanding of the topic and the source of ideas?
Our senses and perception are punctually what connects us humans to the material world. Inspiration came from our experiences within the city (Bucharest), be it daily mundane tasks or special events. Observing the different elements that build the big picture, we found the city to be a difficult-to-read mosaic of senses, each of them pointing in different directions, resulting a misaligned and out of tune image. Thus, our concept looks to bring order to these “colours” of the city, to sharpen and concentrate them and paint a stark accent within the city’s image.

4. When and how you were first introduced to architecture?
Architecture was not something I envisioned pursuing initially. However, one day when I was 16, that changed while I was on vacation in Athens. I got to visit Bernard Tschumi’s New Acropolis Museum. Stepping into the main foyer, I still remember the sense of wonder I felt while glancing upwards at the skylight, as it was casting strong shadows onto its surroundings, feeling the mass and tactility imposed by the materials. The decision to pursue architecture is one that I am grateful for every day, having the power to design through experiences and positively impact my surroundings and the future.

5. What does architecture mean to you?
This field of work envelops every aspect of our daily lives and I find it being a fascinating way of reflecting societal, political and cultural directions. Architecture stands to me as a fundamental yet subtle tool for shaping a society. Whether it is the small task of designing a flower kiosk, or the possible future shift towards extra-planetary endeavours, I find myself glad to be able to positively impact my surroundings.

interview - video 

COLOURS OF THE MIRRORED CITY ©Andrei Dragos Ormangi, Alexandra Elena Burtea & Dana Beatrice Ponyiczky

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COLOURS OF THE MIRRORED CITY ©Andrei Dragos Ormangi, Alexandra Elena Burtea & Dana Beatrice Ponyiczky

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COLOURS OF THE MIRRORED CITY ©Andrei Dragos Ormangi, Alexandra Elena Burtea & Dana Beatrice Ponyiczky

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COLOURS OF THE MIRRORED CITY ©Andrei Dragos Ormangi, Alexandra Elena Burtea & Dana Beatrice Ponyiczky

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